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Sup Motivators! Time for this week’s Motivate Forum recap:

  • Steve Bergeron shared the article, The Positivity Trap
    • Sean Flanagan: I love this! I'd like to hear other people's thoughts though on the example responses in this article. It seemed like a decent chunk are straight out of the DISCOURAGED responses from Motivational Interviewing for Health Care. Questioning their emotional statement ("and you're frustrated?") rather than reflecting and generalizing "a lot of people feel that way"" are the 2 that come to mind immediately.I'm curious if I am missing something in my understanding or if others agree.
    • Josh Hillis I liked that post a lot. I saw a ton of "artificial happiness" trainers at 24 Hour Fitness.I wanted to punch them in the face.Not because I'm against being positive, but because the fakeness. And because it was like oppressive. I saw them totally run over people's feelings.I was always taught that, on a scale of 1-10, you're never more than 1 point more upbeat than your clients. You meet them where they're at.
  • Sean Flanagan asked for advice on how to educate a client on the value of a formal training program
    • Roland Fisher She sounds like she didn't even know about customized programs until now, so she won't know the value, or the purpose, for herself. I'd start with understanding what she gets out of training. She might simply enjoy the process and not even have a performance/physique goal that is connected to training. And honestly as long as someone is training, that is pretty darn good as far as fat loss is concerned.
    • Saul Jimenez First, while I have only trained one person via skype, I am not a huge believer in distance programming. If you can't see them doing the exercise, you don't really know what they are doing. If you still want to program for her, instead of asking her questions, just make up a simple three week cycle with an A, B and C workout (that's what she knows) talk for a few minutes about the workout each time and go from there. Ask with movement rather than words. Given the the "we only track one" post and her response, I would say you aren't doing her any favors by giving her programming.
    • Josh Hillis So ok, let's say she's doing The Daily Burn. Then that's her concept of what fitness is different stuff all the time. She sweats, so it's probably good.You introduce this new concept - she has no frame of reference, and doesn't even really understand what you mean. But you seem smart, so she wants to do it.Then you send her these questions. No answer or vague answers might mean:"I don't understand the question"Or

      "This is too hard"

      Or

      "I don't want to look stupid"

      I think you should give her very generic push/hinge, pull/squat super sets, finish with some intervals. Give her an A and a B workout, and have her email you about each workout and let you know how it went.

      You'll learn more from the emails phone & calls about how to customize her next program.

      And just remember that "custom" just means "I've selected the right program for you."

      It doesn't mean that you did every assessment, corrected every imbalance, and gave her the perfect waist to shoulder ratio based on the Fibonacci Sequence.

    • Sean McBride A pretty smart coach that I reference often said something to the effect of “people tend to get stronger when they pick up heavy things”. As long as she is enjoying her workouts and not doing anything frankly dangerous you can probably leave them as is, you can use it like a baseline. When she asks you about performance goals you can outline a specific progression to add into her program. Slow habit change is probably going to be easier to stick to and more likely to be successful long term.I'd like to hear other people's thoughts though on the example responses in this article. It seemed like a decent chunk are straight out of the DISCOURAGED responses from Motivational Interviewing for Health Care. Questioning their emotional statement ("and you're frustrated?") rather than reflecting and generalizing "a lot of people feel that way"" are the 2 that come to mind immediately.I'm curious if I am missing something in my understanding or if others agree.

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